The desert pocket mouse continues its takeover at Portal

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After trapping rodents August 26-28, it looks like the desert pocketmouse (Chaetodipus penicillatus, pictured below) is continuing do really well, as almost all the other species appear to be doing not-so-well, at least at our site!

Above, the desert pocket mouse is in a plastic bag (photo by S. Cobbold), before we take its measurements. Since we never know what is going to be inside a trap, putting it in a clear plastic bag before handling it gives us a chance to take a look at the animal and to get a good grip on it so it doesn’t escape. Sometimes we catch larger rodents (which can bite!) or other non-rodent animals (which could be venomous!).

Portal has been known for having very high diversity of rodents compared to many other locations; however, if someone had just begun trapping there this year, they would have concluded otherwise. For over a year now, we have been mostly capturing the desert pocket mouse and Merriam’s kangaroo rat (Dipodomys merriami), with only a handful of other species present (i.e. one or two grasshopper mice (Onychomys spp.), Ord’s kangaroo rat (Dipodomys ordii), or cactus mouse (Peromyscus eremicus). This month, there were ONLY Desert pocket mice and Merriam’s kangaroo rat and not a single individual of another species! I think this may be the only time this has ever happened in Portal Project history.

Stephanie Cobbold, a  graduate student at Utah State University in the Jim MacMahon lab, helped out with trapping this month. She studies the sensitivity of species traits to habitat characteristics using spider communities, and we spent our free time looking for spiders, scorpions, and other small arthropods. Since there is a lot of vegetation right now, we saw lots of interesting webs and also saw a scorpion capturing a smaller scorpion! If you’re interested in this side of desert life, check out her great blog post on the spiders of Portal Arizona!

Above: Stephanie Cobbold learns the differences between handling spiders and rodents!

 

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