February trapping

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I traveled to Portal again Feb 18-20, this time meeting a crew of people from New Mexico State University.

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Chaetodipus pencillatus, desert pocket mouse.

Karen Mabry has been especially helpful for finding volunteers and keeping Portal going through our lower-funding times. She also studies rodents, with most of her work with Peromyscus at the Quail Ridge Reserve in California. So she was excited to see that diversity at the site is returning quickly–we’re back up to 10 different species!–and that we caught several incredibly cute cactus mice (Peromyscus eremicus). We also continue to catch the harvest mice (Reithrodontomys megalotis and montanus), which was fun for visiting grad student Katie Smith, who studies the endangered salt marsh harvest mouse in California.

Katie Smith holds a small harvest mouse. Photo by J. Smith.

With so many experienced rodent-trappers, we were able to get through all the captures pretty quickly and leave extra time in the afternoon for Jane Smith to take some measurements for her project. Also an NMSU grad student, she has been investigating the effects of small mammals on soil organic carbon, using the experimental manipulations at our site.

I’ve never captured so many birds before, but 11 of our 110 traps this month has birds in them rather than rodents! Pictured above is a white-crowned sparrow (photo by J. Smith). These were most common, along with black-throated sparrows and a canyon towhee.

Katie Smith, Kristin DaVannon, Sarah Supp, and Karen Mabry (left to right) process the rodents from the exclosure plots. Photo by J. Smith.

(Above) Kristen, an undergraduate student at NMSU, learns that handling rodents is fun! Photo by J. Smith.

The winter plant census is fast approaching, and many flowers were already beginning to bloom in February! I’m optimistic that it will be another beautiful spring. Keep posted for the plant update!

escholtzia mexciana

Poppies are already in bloom! Photo by J. Smith.

Lupinus coccinus.

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